Framed 16:9 images for Home Page slideshow

July 11, 2013  •  Leave a Comment

Currently, our Home Page slideshow images look best when all have a 16:9 aspect ratio.

Some of us like to use digital frames to present our images. But, if you take a 16:9 aspect ratio image and add a digital frame to it, the aspect ratio is altered.

So...how do you create a digitally framed image that ends up having  16:9 aspect ratio?

Well, if you want an even width frame around your image, the trick is to start with an image that's NOT 16:9 ratio, and frame it so that it ends up
at 16:9.

Here's how...

  1. Make a 2:1 aspect ratio image 650 pixels wide by 325 pixels high
  2. Increase canvas size (Ctrl-Alt-C) by relative +2 pixels vertically and horizontally with a colour of your choice. This gives a 1 pixel pinline border.
  3. Increase canvas size (Ctrl-Alt-C) by relative +98 pixels vertically and horizontally with a colour of your choice. This gives an even 49 pixel wide matte around the image.
  4. Width of image is now 750 pixels
  5. But the image is now 425 pixels high! It needs to be 422 pixels (750x422 is a 16:9 aspect ratio)
  6. Ctrl-Alt-C to change canvas size again
  7. Reduce 'relative' the height of the image by -2 pixels
  8. The image is now 423 pixels high
  9. Ctrl-Alt-C to change canvas size again
  10. This time, anchor the bottom of the picture by clicking the bottom centre square of the tic-tac-toe grid
  11. Reduce 'relative' the height of the image by -1 pixels. This shaves 1 pixel off the top. Better to have base of matte wider than top (even if only by 1 pixel!)
  12. Voila!  16:9 image 750 pixels wide


If you want the flexibility of changing your frame colours after the fact, duplicate the Background image between each of the steps 1-3 and lock the pixels (with the layer property).  That way you can flood each layer with a different colour, or gradient, later, without flooding the entire canvas area.

If you want a different width pinline, vary the relative canvas increases in steps 2 & 3. Ensure that your changes don't end up making the final
image wider than 750 pixels.

Better still...make a Photoshop action that uses a preselected foreground and background colour for the canvas growth.

That is, choose your FG & BG colours, then run your action that refers to FG and BG colours.

That's what I do.  Too easy.

f5.6 Rob
 


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